Monthly Archives: November 2017


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It was an absolute honour for me to be asked to share my views about parent caring during this Carers Rights Day 2016. The Local carers team did an amazing job setting this up and putting it all together. Many thanks to the Citizen newspaper for publishing the article. I hope that by creating more awareness, many parent carers will find the courage they need to confront all the uncertainties that lie ahead of them with their children more easily. The UK government tries to provide support through various agencies like the Carers UK,  Social services, Community paediatric teams, Community nurses, and doctors within or outside the hospital setting. In some areas hospice care is made available to families with severely disabled children to help provide some well deserved respite from care while ensuring that their children are still cared for in a safe enviroment. If carers do not come forward to access and the explore various support outlets, they just remain there unused. This defeats the purpose for which they were set up. This is why it is essential for Parent carers to access every possible help and support available. There is really no need no need to carry the burden of caring for a child alone. There is no need to habour fears about consequences of accessing well deserved support. Most of the fears will be reduced once parent carers begin to ask the right questions about what is available to ease the burden of care life throws at them with the existence of the illness of their child. There is a saying that a problem shared is halved. True, but I always like to think that this only holds if you share it with the right person. Getting support, asking questions and letting others help will be synonymous with sharing your problem with the right person. It is  truly the right of every carer to access this support. You are not being too demanding you are just being wise and proactive. That on its own deserves applause! I decided to share the article here To show my support for awareness being created on this Carers Rights day. Thank you as always for your support and readership. I know you do not realise it but every time you click, read and share my work you not only spread the word about what you have read but you support me on my own journey. It is strengthening that you find my work useful. Thank you. So sit back, relax and enjoy the interview…. Carers Rights Day takes place on the 25th of November, a national campaign which brings unpaid carers, support charities and local communities together to help carers understand their rights and the support they are entitled to. Carers MK supports over 4500 unpaid carers in Milton Keynes providing essential advice and information to those providing unpaid care to a relative or friend who due to illness, disability or frailty cannot manage without support. Case Study:  Parent Carer, Mrs Hope Carers UK support those providing care and support to a child who is ill, has a physical or learning disability or additional needs. Parent carers face huge uncertainties, stresses and challenges when faced with coping with their child’s condition, and it is important that they receive emotional support, advice and information to help them in their particular caring situation. Parent Carer Mrs Hope has a four year old son who has an inherited metabolic condition called Propionic Acidaemia. His body cannot break down proteins but builds toxins in his blood. He was diagnosed when he was just 3 days old after he went into Coma due to an overload of toxin called Ammonia. and in February 2016 was admitted to Great Ormond Street hospital with chronic pancreatitis. He cannot be fed by mouth but with specialist intravenous feeds called TPN into a big vein in his heart. Mrs Hope is now juggling visits to Great Ormond Street while also looking after her 5yr old son Mark. She and her husband take turns in shuttling between their local hospital  and London to care for the boys. It is extremely strenuous on the whole family, emotionally, physically and psychologically.   Q  &  A   What are the biggest challenges you face as a parent carer? My biggest challenge has been accepting that my 4yr old son will not be perfect in every way a child should be. It was very devastating when he was diagnosed. Initially I felt overwhelmed with guilt because I learnt that the condition was an inherited one. Simply meaning that it came to be as a result of mine and my husband’s matching but defective genes. The realisation that his condition was incurable and degenerative fuelled my sadness for him. It was also hard to make his 5yr old brother understand that his younger brother was different. My 4 year old also suffers from severe autism (as a result of the Propionic Acidaemia). This meant that the 5 yr old brother initially struggled, believing the 4yr old deliberately chose not want to play with him. Our acceptance of the whole condition early meant we were able to reach out for help and support for our family.       How do you manage caring for your son in hospital while looking after other members of your family? I have managed considerably well since I began letting everyone in where safely possible. With a son as delicate as my 4 yr old, I initially felt I needed to do everything for him myself to get things done properly. Unfortunately, I struggled that way. I learnt to share the responsibility for him with the nurses at my local hospital or GOSH London (depending on where he was admitted). This freed up time for me to go home at least once a week to be a mum to my other son- to do the school run, take him to the park or just cuddle him. I have fed off this bit of normalcy. […]

Interview with the Local media


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Lots of students are hit with the harsh reality that university education unlike any other entails a lot of writing. What I prefer to see as “feedback”. It can be seen as something (data) that serves to inform future steps. (Glick M 2011). It happens when a person is allowed to give an opinion about how an activity or interaction has gone. It can be a good or bad opinion. It is usually delivered to someone else or maybe the organiser or other people involved in the activity or interaction. It is not enough to read many books as a student. There is also the need to relay what one has read to evidence understanding in such a way that can only be arrived at by critically analysing all that has been read. There was a report carried out in the US in 1990 by the Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCAN). In this report it was determined that upon graduation, students should have acquired skills in literacy, computer usage data analysis and evaluation. In a nutshell, they should have information gathering skills to take into their lives. (Department of Labour 1992). The problem with getting information as a student is knowing what information to get or if what has been gathered will be relevant. The risk is usually in using only a small set of resources irrespective of the problem at hand. This poses the need to acquire this information literacy by learning to find a link between the use of the librarian, faculty and information technology resources available to meet the requirements of the problem at hand. (Weiner 2010). Interestingly, becoming informational literate helps improve our overall awareness as students. It cannot be acquired without sharpening very many aspects including our writing, analytical and listening skills. In the process we learn how to summarise what we have read from various sources into a few words. These become the feedback that we present in the form of assignments, essays and exams. Our writing is also show that we not only understand overall learning outcomes for the course but are able to apply our knowledge specifically to help solve the problems presented by the assignment, essay or exam. It also provides the opportunity for our hard work to be graded. This ultimately ascribes value to our degrees once attained. Information gathering is a cumbersome task. We need to have a fair understanding of what the question is because it is the basis for the whole exercise. It guides the search. Planning the search for the information needed to answer the question require time, patience and strategy. When information is found, questions regarding the suitability of the source of information become necessary. The helps to give the final product derived from the information some credibility and integrity. It is important to know more of the work and why. It is also important to know when the article was written to determine their relevance to the question being answered. In addition, the student has to find ways to put down what has been learnt. Where a quote is used, the marks to determine their start and end should clearly be applied. Techniques like paraphrasing, summarising and mind mapping can be used to sieve out relevant information regarding the question that the essay is required to answer.(UNPAC 2017). Only after all this has been properly done understood then begin to validly engage in a full analysis of the information that has been gathered. It may also include disturbance thoughts, doubts and in-depth analysis. This is the evidence of understanding that academic writing presents. In the end, the learning provider creates a fair system for submission. This allows the work done by students to be checked for similarities. The aim is to reduce copying, cheating and plagiarism. It also encourages students to use references and citations where multiple sources are used. (UNPAC 2017) Personally I feel very daunted by this concept of academic writing. It has now dawned on me that knowing how to write is only one piece of the academic writing jigsaw puzzle. Citation and referencing are certainly good skills to take on board. They would help a person separate facts from their  personal opinions as they write. Improving on communication skills to aid interaction with others helps to check and share ideas. This an article was about writing awareness and the requirements for attaining an academic level of writing. It looked at the importance of researching widely during academic writing tasks. It emphasised on the seriousness of the exercise and showed that there was no room for students to droll over the idea of using appropriate citation and referencing in their work. More importantly it focused on the need for appropriate citation and referencing to give credit to sources used.   Thank you for reading as always. There are many other posts like these. Do you know you might like them? Click here Photo credit : Pixabay   REFERENCES Department of Labour (1992) Secretary’s commission on achieving necessary skills. http://wdr.doleta.gov/SCANS/ Accessed 6 Aug 2013 Margaret Glick (2011) The Instructional Leader and the Brain: Using Neuroscience to inform practice. Corwin press pp113 Chapter 5 Weiner S L (2010) Information literacy: in neglected core competency. Educaus 33(1) Google scholar. UNPAC (2017) Northampton  

What’s all the fuss about academic writing?



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Letting people we love make their own mistakes is an art that I feel we all need to master. For those of us who give ourselves entirely when we care, we can sometimes unintentionally burden people with the level of care and affection that we shower them. It’s hard for them to understand why we just never back off but we only “nag” them because we care. Well I don’t feel that I nag but that’s they word that gets thrown left, right and centre when you keep on warning about the impending disaster. How many times have I seen someone I love ten steps away from a move that will lead to disaster and panicked? Countless times. I have expressed my panic and received sticks in return. Leave me alone … I know what I am doing … It’s my life, my rules, my mistakes!   These become the broken record they play to my listening ears. Yet when the disaster strikes the record changes to Don’t say I told you so or why did you not stop me! Should I have pushed harder despite their express declination or was I right to respect their feelings and let them do things their way? It’s such a hard balance but veering towards the latter means that you allow peace reign. You also show them respect and love by stepping back. This in turn gives them the chance to discover things by themselves. This reminds me of an African saying. I shall just translate it … Don’t tell the child to stay away from flames because when they feel the heat or get burnt from it as a result of their curiosity, they will never play close to the table where the lamp sits. Many people learn better from their mistakes and experiences while others like to add other people’s experiences to their learning pool. No matter how much you scream or honk at them, it feels like they chose to ignore the advice because it came from you. Being a familiar person tends to make you get taken for granted after all they say a prophet is hardly known in his hometown. What better age to live in than now when opinions abound. The internet is filled with chat rooms and fora of all sorts with people sharing and sometimes exaggerating their experiences for full effect. Many are also surrounded with family and friends who volunteer unsolicited advice. While that can be a pain, it can also be a treasure if you have the right level of discernment to help you sieve the chaff from the grain. Trust me discernment is a skill you acquire over time! I have just escaped an interaction with a loved one on the verge of making what I think to be a costly mistake but their mind is made up on their preferred course of action. As usual, I have to swallow the bitter pill of respecting their decisions and taking the difficult step back. It takes a lot of courage to let sleeping dogs lie. So tell me, have you found yourself in this situation before? What did you do about it? Thanks for reading. Photo credit: Pixabay There are many other posts like these. Do you know you might like them? Click here

Shhh…Stop telling me what to do!