Monthly Archives: June 2017


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It’s so beautiful to have you in my life. I was just thinking about how long I have had you in my life. It’s been my most successful and longest career. Of all the things I have got wrong and messed up sometimes, you are the one I always get right. You get me and I get you. You are the only key that can unlock my doors. You see what others don’t see on me. I can be me when I am with you. You hear what I say even before I speak. No matter how I hide you always find me. You have been with me through thick and thin. The pains and joys of life are more palatable because you are by my side. You let me shine and step back when I fall because you cushion the impact with your presence. You only want me to live free. I would never have carried out many crazy ideas if you did not believe so strongly in me. You are the most silent friend I have who speaks volumes with the depth of your patience. I envy you because you are everything I wish I could be. You have all the beauty I could only dream of. You are annoyingly handsome with the most irritatingly long eyelashes. You are as crazy as Otito was. Ever quiet and regarding people. You will never be as sweet though because you are now old meat! But you are my love. I tell you always but today I want to celebrate you. You know I hate making public declarations of my love for you but life has become so uncertain that the much we express about those we love when we feel can may be all we can give. It makes no sense writing eulogies for dead people who would never read them. I want to celebrate you because it’s important that you hear and know you are loved while you can. God bless you my darling….. Thank you Thank you for reading. You may also like to read other articles like this. They can be found here. Photo Credit: Selfie

For you…..my love.


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It was magical to be able to visit the hospital again since my boy answered his call… The members of staff were as warm and welcoming as always. To me they are family and it was an absolute joy to visit them again. A whole lot had changed on the ward since the whole year that I lived there. For starters, the corridors had been given a new lease of life with a paint splash. Everywhere looked brand-new. Also some of the staff had moved on from the ward and new ones had replaced them. It was really nice to see some old faces who knew Otito again. I spent nearly an hour saying hello’s and catching up with all my hospital friends, medical staff, support staff, canteen, social workers etc. It was so uplifting. In fact, it was a strengthening experience from a grief point of view. As I walk along the corridors, I still experienced magical feelings of the memory laden foot- steps I took down the hallways. Every nook and cranny reminded me of my boy but not in a sad way. My brain was forgetting the pain that those memories once conjured. I could gradually feel my memories metamorphose from pain to fondness. It was nice to remember my boy again through the faces of the familiar staff that surrounded me on that visit. It was magical to remember him on the corridors and in his favourite places around the hospital. As I walked through the streets, I remembered him on the sidewalks, the gardens and I even attempted to look through my eyes “then”. It was incredible how in those precious moments with my son, we were both carving Indelible memories for me to hold and treasure as I was doing and hoping to always do during my visits to  the Great Ormond Street Hospital -GOSH. I knew that in time I would move on from the hospital life but it was nice to be able to enjoy and treasure those moments for as long as they lasted.  I could not see everyone but it was not surprising considering that I did not stay too long. GOSH would always be home for me because as long as the walls stood, my memories will always come to life when I walk through those great big sliding doors. So the Peter Pan magic was real for me today. Like a child I still believe in it. My boy is now flying high in a place where he would never grow old. I remain eternally grateful to all the wonderful people behind those walls at GOSH for giving me those 4 special years to share with my boy! Thank you for reading. You may also like to read other articles like this. They can be found here. Photo credit: Pixabay.

The Peter-pan Magic! – My visit to GOSH



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Today I wanted to tell you about an event I attended. It was in support of  the  Learning Disability (LD)Week 2017. I was privileged to be invited to sit on a panel alongside Experts and parents to share our lived experiences in order to help health professionals appreciate the impact of the care they provide through our own eyes. It was a fantastic day at Great Ormond street Hospital London. The heat was less, allowing us to have an enjoyable session. It always feels great to come home to GOSH! Mencap– the voice of learning disability in the U.K. Supported us and it was a fantastic and empowering event to have been a part of. The need for LD nurses on the NHS cannot be over emphasised. We talked about the huge difference staff could make in transforming care for children and the families of children who walk through the hospital doors. We revealed how important it was to have someone who understand the needs of the children. Nurses in their role could also mediate on behalf of the children when their voices could not be heard as result of their Learning Disabilities. Learning disabilities limit the ability of sufferers to understand and learn. It made them appreciate things slowly but not impossibly. Parents talked about the impact of a “smile” from the staff. It helped foster the always values of the hospital. It made them feel more welcome and made an absolute difference to stressful outpatient appointments. Patient said they wished they could be acknowledged more and included when decisions about them were being made. Breaking down communication by using simpler language helps patients with learning disabilities feel included. Non-verbal does not mean that a child or young person cannot understand. Body language and tone of voice hold a strong an essential key to communicating with them. They can help non verbal children warm up! We also discussed about the difference a little patience and empathy can make in the lives of patients and their families.  It was nice to hear feedback from health professionals about the our challenges with dealing with children with learning disabilities. Notable among the feedback we received was how the “Patient passports” that provide more detailed and specific information were found to also fuel the anxiety of staff in delivering the care. Worrying about getting things wrong with these children compromised the confidence of some staff. It was reassuring for them to hear from parents how much it meant to see staff go above and beyond for their children despite their inner misgivings.  Parents were acknowledged as experts with their children by the Health Care Professionals but ultimately, the general consensus was for there to be a partnership between all parties with the child always at the centre of the decisions. This was in line with the GOSH  slogan The Child first and always. The event closed at 4pm and we all felt richer and more informed. Chapter 18 of the book “Through our eyes: what parents want for their children from health professionals” written by Jim Blair and Parents was the basis for our meeting. Jim Blair is a Consultant nurse in Learning disabilities and an Associate professor. Mary Busk, Hayley Goleniowska (Author of down side up), Simon Hawtrey-Woore, Sue Morris, Yvonne Newbold (Author of Special Parents Handbook) and Stephanie Nimmo were all contributors to the book and Experts by Parental Experience.  Photo Credit: Pixabay                 EVALUATION AND FEEDBACK FROM STAFF AFTER THE EVENT Through OUR eyes what people with learning disabilities and parents want from health professionals   The majority of staff were nurses or HCA’s others were doctors, play therapists or from facilities environment design department    How well do you feel the learning outcomes were met today? ‘Very well, much more informative than expected’ ‘The session fully met my expectations’ ‘I don’t know what the learning outcomes were’ ‘I think the session was very important. I feel I can take away new skills and knowledge and use them in my practice.’ ‘x4 Very well’ ‘Beyond expectations.’ ‘V good.’ ‘No outcomes given at start’ ‘Very well, met my learning outcomes.’ ‘ They were met well. A lot of discussion that prompted other topics to discuss.’ ‘The session has been very usful. It has provided me with the knowledge and the experts experiences was interesting.’ ‘A good start, foundation to find out more. Good patient / carer interaction., More.’ ‘Quite well, very out patient based, maybe some more ideas of facilitate nurses and teams on ward area.’ ‘A really interesting discussion and insightful to hear parent experiences.’ ‘I feel the outcome has been met and even several spots have been touched on. I belive understanding, acknowledging, confidence have been the key aspects.’   How will today’s session improve your practice? ‘To not be afraid and be more confident when dealing with patients with disabilities’ ‘I will consider the specific needs of the LD community in the design of departments’ ‘Might consider exploring idea of artist led training sessions for clinical staff around LD’ ‘it helped me to understand the concerns the people with ld have’ ‘By talking what the parent and patient needs from listening. Listening to listen not listening to speak and by working in partnership with them’ ‘x2 Greatly.’ ‘Increased awareness of specific accommodations that can be made for people with learning disabilities.’ ‘it will help me understand the struggle, stigma and fight the patient and families may have been through and how to approach and respond to them. It also has taught me not to be afraid or fear them but to smile and be confident when dealing with a child who has a learning disabilities.’ ‘See, say hello and smile.’ ‘It will make me more aware of how I communicate with patients an dtheir family. As well as how I offer care.’ ‘By treating all patients with LD the same way but ensuring communicating in the way they need to be […]

Learning Disability Week 2017 at Great Ormond Street Hospital


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If you knew that you had a shorter time will you do things differently? Life can sometimes be like a football match. Not that we are all football fans but anyone who has seen a football match will agree that it can seem very life-like sometimes. Teams, usually 2 in number, get themselves set for a game with one purpose in mind: Winning! It is funny how both sides keep hoping to win while knowing that not more than one side will actually win. Even when beset with challenges and odds stacked for or against either side, their optimism does not diminish. The mix of events that occur throughout the match are as unpredictable as life itself. They are filled with ups and downs and not forgetting good or bad luck despite the quality of play executed by the teams. What this means in effect is that a deserving side can win based on their skill sets or  sometimes lose based on the mood of “mother luck”. How many times have we thought that a team had the winning ticket only for them to lose at the last minute swinging the victory to the less deserving side despite all their prowess? One other resemblance that a football match can have with life is the way the teams struggle and give the best when the the game is nearly over. This is very interesting considering the teams had all the time in the world to pull out their miracle winning trick. One wonders why most times, teams leave their best performance till late. It is said that we should save the best for the last but in football terms it seems foolish! If the last minute frantic performance put up by the struggling teams begin slightly earlier, they would not have to struggle so much. We all do this too…. We live like we would exist for ever. Procrastinating and shuffling through life. Wasting away valuable time… Time that we can spend more preciously… …Wisely… As soon as we see a date in sight… death! We gasp and begin to appreciate how much more we could have done with the time we had. Sickness, disease or a health scare can jolt our reality into focus. We become more aware of the fleetingness of life. Bucket lists become moulded to fit in all the “important” stuff. At that cliff edge of life when we are about to slip away we see clearly what is really important, Items spring into our bucket list and like our lives, the buckets lack the depth to contain all we truly desire to achieve. Life us simply too short even for those standing far from that cliff edge only they do not realise it. Just because you are healthy and not being given the sad news of impending death does not mean you are really safe from it. The only ones given the gift of finally appreciating life are those who can sniff the end drawing closer. In essence, when life is nearly over, it becomes clearer what enjoying life really means. We begin to try to make up for lost time. Suddenly life begins to be lived to the fullest. Interestingly, those clutching at the last ticks of life begin to be the ones who know how to enjoy life. They know how not to waste precious moments. Sadly, the moments become so precious because there becomes an actual struggle to fit every single activity into the short time left. It doesn’t have to be that way…. So I wonder …. What if you and I who are not in a position to feel that our time is running out began to be more conscious of the unpredictable nature of life…fleeting life? Would we do things differently? If so, it may be necessary to rethink how we are currently spending every moment of our lives…. We can make a conscious effort never to lose sight of the fact that life is too short. We are all closer to the end than we realise. Sometimes, our loved ones slip away and leave us wishing we had spent more time caring for them. Sometimes our circumstances change and we move far away rendering many chapters we currently ignore or take for granted closed. We can take advantage of every moment we have by living life to the fullest…. Live life to the fullest because no one knows the day or the hour they will go. We all may go in different ways. Death is only one way. Relocation, heartbreak, separation, divorce, ideological differences, work transfer, dream pursuits and so on. Suddenly the time we have to spend with our loved ones becomes scarce. Just because we sit around the table with our families today does not mean the headcounts will be complete next week! … Life happens… So why not savour  every present moment? Stop leaving till tomorrow what you can accomplish today. Delay can be dangerous. If you have friends, hang out! If you have family, spend more time together! Some of the most fun things you can share with family and friends  are free. The gift of your time will not even cost a dime! It does not matter how much you spend when you are with your loved one. What matters is the quality of the connection you achieve with that person in the time you share together. A fortune spent on a gift will only matter if a connection is made. You can also make the same connection if you spend time together. Let the acquisition of material wealth for presents not hinder the quality time that can otherwise be shared with loved ones. It may mean nothing if the time you share together does not translate into happiness for you both. Is there an activity you have always wished to perform? Why not stop putting it off ? Stop over analysing it and just do it! You may not have the time you have […]

What will you do when the time is up!



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My son Otito was born with a metabolic condition called Propionic Acidaemia. This condition sadly compromised his body’s ability to breakdown proteins. The implication of this was that he suffered with lots of metabolic decompensations and his body easily built up toxins called Ammonia in his blood. As a result of this degenerative condition, he was developmentally behind for his age.  His social and communication skills where severely impaired and he mostly existed in a world of his own. As a result, he was subsequently diagnosed with severe autism and learning disabilities. It was a huge shock to me as his mother to accept that my son would be different from other children. I took steps to overcome this feeling by getting as much information as I could once the diagnosis was made. His consultant at the time was very kind and eager to explain the condition to me. Before long, I understood most of the implications of the condition for my child. I also learnt about ways to spot the early signs of a metabolic crisis. Sadly, detecting the early signs did not prevent the metabolic crises that he characteristically suffered. The rate at which they occurred meant that he became a very unstable child. He became frequently hospitalised to keep him safe. Unfortunately, that also meant that he spent more time in hospital than we all would have hoped. By his 3rd  year of life, he suffered  a further complication of his condition with chronic pancreatitis and became hospitalised for one year to keep him safe. During his admission, we encountered many Health Care Professionals (HCPs). These were made up of medical staff functioning in different capacities and across various disciplines within the hospital.. While they all had the sole purpose of delivering excellent healthcare to our son, it was hard to get them to understand the care he needed because his level of development impaired his ability to express these needs appropriately. As his mother, I was also his advocate. I sprang to his defence like a mother hen every time his needs were missed. It was difficult to get the staff to listen. His inability to communicate left him non-verbal. He was also unable to express his emotions appropriately. For example, his expression of pain was not by crying or screaming as characteristically normal for most children. Instead, he became more quiet, withdrawn, less mobile and inactive. This pain response was mainly interpreted as being calm but not in pain. He was also very sensitive to being touched or held. During pain episodes, this touch sensitivity always became worse. His only position of comfort was always one where he could lie curled in a foetal position. He tended to pull in his limbs and stayed in the corner of the bed grinding his teeth. It was heart breaking to see him suffer at a time when he was closest to care. I cried for him every time he pulled away. I cried for the pain he could not express. I wished more than ever that he could do the same. I could not even communicate that to him. It was a helpless situation to be in as a mother. I could not pick him up to cuddle him or comfort him either as he could not tolerate such interactions as a result of being autistic. When the pain team got involved, I was a bit hopeful. However, his scores were low on their charts. The pain charts recorded higher scores for pain based on normal responses. For example screaming, being irritable and displaying active movements especially kicking to show pain was ranked highly. Incidentally, the pain endured by most pancreatitis sufferers I had met where always likened to excruciating labour pains experienced during childbirth. It was no wonder that the HCPs only disagreed with me every time I suggested that he was having yet another bout of the pancreatitis pain cycle. They could not justify the need to give the level of pain relief I was requesting since the pain scores they charted did not support my claim However, given his status as a severely autistic child with learning disabilities it was really not far-fetched. Their lack of experience with this type of autism that could lead to such pain responses in children meant that my son was unintentionally left to suffer. I knew I had to seek help for my son but had no idea how. As time went by my son became very withdrawn. While what the health professionals saw was more of a quiet boy, what I saw was less of my child and more of a chronic patient. To them his quietness was only a confirmation that he was after all unwell. We kept hitting brick walls at every corner trying to get him the help he needed in those first few months when he was admitted. It was while out on a walk along the hospital corridor one day that I made a discovery that changed the course of my son’s care for the better. After one of my routine arguments about the need to administer more pain relief for my son, I needed a change of scenery. That was when I accidentally stumbled across a leaflet hanging casually from a rack on the wall. It revealed the information about the existence of an expert in the hospital called Jim Blair who specialised in supporting families who had children with learning disabilities (LD). He happened to be a consultant and lead nurse in this area. Surprisingly and in the most unceremonious fashion, help finally arrived when I least expected it! Jim was very helpful and approachable. I was able to discuss my concerns easily with him. It was relieving to find someone-a health professional who finally understood my son’s plight. He simply got it! The pain responses that I described to him were anything but alien. In fact he said it was quite common with children who had the level of […]

Hospital life : Getting health care right in hospitals for people with complex health needs and intellectual disability


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As I was on my way out to get some food this afternoon, I saw a group of people. There were like hundreds of them walking along the corridor towards me. They appeared to be on an organised walk. What was interesting was the presence of the lady in front of the pack. She should have left them to go on their own because they simply ignored her! There was a din. Lots of chitchat going on. Suddenly the corridor leading to the hospital restaurant was like a marketplace. The people seemed to be cooing at everything they came across as they walked past. “oh this”… “oh that”….”wow this”… “wow that”! Honestly, I could not understand why they all looked so surprised. It was a hospital after all and nothing was new. It had walls, interesting pictures, a lovely ambience, clean surroundings and so on. It really had nothing inconsistent with what you would expect from a hospital especially in England. …Yet the babbling went on… The lady moderator was speaking but it seemed like the more she tried to raise her voice, the less attention she got from them. As she screamed louder, it got worse. I found the whole idea of the walk around the hospital absolutely irritating. You see, Great Ormond Street Hospital or GOSH was one of the creme de la creme in terms of paediatric medicine in the world. It was always a privilege in itself to walk along such a corridor where historical breakthroughs had been pouring since 1852 when it was established. It was a hospital whose main source of funding addition to other means of funding was made possible through charitable donations and thankfully so. The well-meaning public through various methods contributed a great deal to the fund base at GOSH. This was why from time to time one could understand why the hospital opened its doors to members of the public. It was however highly appalling to witness a near breakdown in decorum when one of such visits was allowed. I imagined that it must have been exciting day out for these people. However what they failed to bear in mind was that it was “a hospital” in the first instance.It was a place of treatment and recuperation. It is therefore expected that the serenity, calm and tranquility of the hospital must be preserved and respected by all who walk through its doors. Although it is not likely that visitors will be given a tour of the main wards, they must be made aware that parents, carers and visitors to the hospital may find all the hullabaloo disturbing. They have to be more considerate about the feelings of these main hospital users who have to use the corridors alongside organised walks such as these. Personally, as a parent, seeing the people behave in this way made me feel a bit vulnerable. It made me feel like the idea of patient-hood was being put on display and made a show of. I know it was not the intended purpose of the exercise but perhaps if the decorum and tranquillity of the hospital was not disturbed, the visits by these people would have yielded a more positive experience for hospital residents like me. On a different day and at a different time, I am sure that many parents and carers like myself may have overlooked the noise. However, the feelings of parents and carers tend to be very erratic, varied and unpredictable. The hospital walls housed people who were being pushed to the limits of their psychological strength by the sickness of their children.These category of people unlike most have had to cope with all sorts of treatments, plans and news about their children. Many were very sleep deprived while others looked forward to the corridor walks as their only time of respite. While these seem like only a few minutes of break, for these parents, they were important even for their sanity. At the end of the day, it was still sweet and appreciable to see people take time out of their own busy schedules to visit hospitals especially  paediatric ones like GOSH. This act of kindness must take into consideration the feelings of all users. This way the thoughtfulness of the well-meaning  members of the public would translate into a good experience for all concerned every time it is expressed. So next time we visit places like hospitals, care homes, hospices and so on even for the sake of charity or any other reason, it may not be such a bad idea to follow the lead of the moderator, quiet down a little, step the excitement down a notch to allow our presence not disturb the peace of the place. This way the good we intend to do will count. Thank you for reading. If you enjoyed reading this, you may also enjoy some other topics we have discussed in this series. Photo credit: Pixabay

Hospital life: When groups visit the hospital



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Sometimes you cannot really predict what lies around the corner. I know it is one of those cliche’s but honestly, I literally appreciated the meaning of that statement when I stepped into the corner from the hospital today. I was just taking a stroll to clear my head when I noticed a beehive of activities brewing in the center square. Queen’s square is around the corner from the Great Ormond Street hospital and this Saturday  there was a fair. The organizers were not leaving anything to chance. They had set up the fair rather quickly. It seemed to have sprung up from out of the blues. Endless tables clustered the square. On them were so many different wares all displayed in order to sell for charity. Lovely trinkets, bangles, beads and fancy jewelries drew my attention. I do love a bit of bling.There were books, bric-a-brac and all sort of things. Some tables looked like someone’s house had been emptied out for the auction! Children ran around gaily and the face painting stand had a queue forming rapidly. There were some OAP’s{ Old Aged People} practicing their singing while others seemed to be dancing. Some people sat on the chairs while some tables at the end of the square had home-made food. The lovely smell of pastry filled the air and an interesting looking man in a red hat shook a tiny bell fiercely in his hands screaming out the next activity about to occur in the church nearby. Ding ding ding  rang his bell…. ” The ballet will be starting in five minutes” he said a bit inaudibly. I could hardly make out what he said in the din. As I stood by in the corner taking it all in, I heard a guitar being strummed. It blared through the public address system and I made my way towards the stage. The stage stood cleverly at the center of the fair. As the man strummed his guitar, suddenly a lovely dancing tune was created by his band and they all sang and played. Soon some people formed a circle before the band. It was really a happy atmosphere and so I let myself go. I let the music take me like a lover wooing his beau and in no time I responded by joining the dance. It was as fun as it was groovy! Happiness like the one I beheld on the day was contagious…. There was laughter everywhere. It did not matter what emotional baggage or problems we all had. In that moment, we were happy and that was all that mattered. So this time, something good lay around the corner from the hospital. For once it was not any bad news or event but a good piece of fun and enjoyment and the best part was that it was free!!! This piece was written as a thank you to Mary ward center who were the organisers of the Queen’s square fair. It was really fun and you made people happy that day. Many thanks to you also for reading. You may also like to read other articles like this. They can be found here. Photo credit: Pixabay.  

The Fair at Queen’s Square


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Feminism should not create the yardstick by which women should express themselves. It should not make rules or tell women how to be female. It should create a platform to enable women showcase and express their diverse natures and features as women Don’t get me wrong, fashion and style are not bad in themselves. Women by their nature love to be beautifully adorned, glamorous and attractive. It gives them the boost they need when the situation warrants it. It helps them rise to the “occasion”. However, most of these adornments and practices are not natural. Many are man-made. Something that is not natural can be good for short-term, occasional use but surely not long-term daily use. That said, another concern is the risk they may impose on a woman’s mental view about herself. By adorning this fashion and styles too regularly, sometimes, the view of the person regarding their self image starts to become distorted. A new 3D image becomes projected daily through enhancements, styles and various beauty regimes until but the woman in question as well as her onlookers start to forget the original less fantastic image of the woman. It then gets to a point where the woman rejects herself, her real image… in the mirror. This problem creeps in gradually until even the woman begins to want this image to be painted on as soon as she opens her eyes to the world. Feminism means women are now free to express themselves in any way they choose. For those in the media as well as the so-called icons of feminism who project only perfect images for others to copy I ask is this truly feminism? Should feminism not also include ways to help women accept who they are? A little touch up here and there might be okay but surely a complete metamorphosis (to the extent that an un-adorned “self” becomes unrecognisable) cannot be healthy. That’s not to mention the constant blow taken by the female skin from the endless array of products which leave the woman in a vicious cycle of perfection. This is on the other hand to the delight of the capitalist who sells enough products to feed various stages in the cycle depending on the aspect of perfection or enhancement the woman chooses to fixate on. Make up, hair, skin, weight-loss, diets etc. Nobody is perfect…. At this juncture, a rather dissimilar analogy comes to mind and so, i digress but with good reason. Bad music…. I remember the case of bad music as a child. A particular song would be released by the media. The popular opinion about that song would be that it was more of a joke than a song. The initial response would be of disdain and apathy towards everything that made up the musical piece. However in no time, as the radio station carried on playing the “joke song” regardless, the opinions about the song would begin to change. Not to appoint a love but mostly to a point of tolerance. After months of airplay people although acknowledging the imperfections of the “joke song”, would begin to hear other aspects, elements and less obvious sounds in the song until it became palatable. In no time, a point would be reached when people would find themselves chanting the song. As ridiculous as this was, It was all because they became used to hearing the song. Now back to my argument…. Perhaps beauty, fashion and feminism can be treated this way. Women must not only be able to express their feminism in the way they like, but must also be empowered to resist the pressure of conforming with any set rules for female expression. Perhaps if women continue to constantly project and impose their real selves on the world and stopped succumbing to the idea of picture-perfectedness, like the music on the radio in our earlier analogy, they will become accepted for who they are. Maybe if women did not curl away at the slightest criticism of the imperfection, they will be taken more seriously. It is fair to say that people will only take us as seriously as we take ourselves. We all have to learn that completely and constant acceptability is not real. Nobody is perfect…. Not really. People tend to project aspects of themselves that are appealing to others. Nobody puts their bad foot in front first at least not knowingly. Neither the people dry their dirty linen in public. People hardly go for interviews showcasing their weaknesses while leaving the strengths at home. Therefore we are all flawed by our imperfections and made unique because they exist. If we choose to only focus on what we lack in our beauty, body, wardrobe, then we lose sight of the bigger picture. In the same way you are not only your face or your hair or your shape or your belly as you may want to believe. You are a complete package. You are a person…a woman. Be the self that makes and keeps you happy. Do not join the team natural (who do not adorn or beautify themselves even for special occasions) if you don’t want to. Stay on the team you want because you want to and not because you have been forced to by the media, people or even your demands on yourself. Remember, the real people who love you will do so unconditionally. So stay true to yourself. Thank you for reading If you enjoyed reading this article there are many others like it on this website. You can find them here. Photo credit: Pixabay

Should we all really be Feminists? (Stay true to the woman within) Part 2